Dear Chancellor

Dear Chancellor

Dear Chancellor,

I know that you’re in a difficult position, one in which many FDs would empathise: borrowing is high; problems, especially social care/health and housing, need solving; and tax rises (cost cutting to an FD) aren’t popular.

If you think that you can “kick the can down the road” by borrowing more, then good luck. Markets will correct in the next year or two and conventional economics dictate that interest rates should fall. Unless they have risen by then this won’t be a cure, as Japan’s experience demonstrates. And if they rise the cost to the Exchequer will start to pinch other budgets.

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Funny money?

Funny money?

While the Tory party conference was, ahem, in full flow, I heard a debate among political commentators observing the current political landscape. Their conclusion was that fewer and fewer people don’t feel that they have a stake in the capitalist system. This disillusionment is driving support to the socialist dream of Jeremy Corbyn in which wealth is distributed fairly (from the few to the many). Those appearing most attracted to this vision are young people who haven’t experienced the turmoil of the 1970s. We were youths once; we knew it all back then and didn’t need history as a guide. I always saw Robin Hood’s antics as necessitated more by the absence of Good King Richard than Bad King John. Only latterly did I form the view that there have always been bad people in some positions of power for a long time. But it also doesn’t follow that everyone in power is a bad person –as we all learned at school, the converse is not true.

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12 thoughts for Christmas

12 thoughts for Christmas

While 2016 may have been a challenging year on the global front, our personal lives have not been much affected yet, it seems: full employment, rising/stable markets and the only unrest so far has been transport – hardly a change. But only a hermit could fail to take note of the marked change in the world order at the start of 2017 which could lead to some of the dramatic effects of which we’ve been warned.

We develop coping strategies to deal with threats and one of the most successful for me has been singing, with Some Voices, – “The closest thing to being a rock star”. Whatever my mood, its sound never fails to warm my heart and tingle my spine. And it is now a thriving community, like the best village where everyone is accepted, no-one is talked about negatively and whose harmony is the perfect metaphor for guiding a rapidly splintering world.

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Capitalism 2.0

Capitalism 2.0

It seems that in the four years that I have been writing my blog the world has been getting stranger and stranger. I’m not referring to Hillary Clinton’s bid to be the first female president of the USA, but Glenda Jackson’s portrayal of King Lear on a set adorned with plastic chairs, whose manservant turns out to be Ian from The Archers. Oh, and the vote, announced on our 9/11 that the US had Trumped the UK in its decision to blow a rather large raspberry at the Establishment.

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BOPing

BOPing

As a bit of a writer I’m fascinated by the way language evolves and love to get new words and TLAs (whilst also trying to avoid phrases that become over-worked: if I hear another star tell me how ‘privileged’ they are I will have to fight the urge to bop him on the nose). Did you know that BoP now stands for Bottom of Pyramid, the poorest in our world? But it is also shorthand for Balance of Payments which has been an issue for the UK longer than there has been a BoP class.

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Swing low SME exporters

Swing low SME exporters

I stopped buying the Sunday Times a while ago because its chief rugby correspondent, one Stephen Jones, refused to fully recognize the success of my beloved England rugby team. No matter how low the sweet chariot was swung Mr. Jones (of Wales) would continue to say it was still far from acceptable.

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